ukclique > railway

Marc Van Dyck (28.08.2017, 17:31)
Certes presented the following explanation :
> On 27/08/17 17:57, Marc Van Dyck wrote:
> There's still a lot of local resentment at spending money we didn't have
> on years of disruption, for a vehicle that has fewer seats than a double
> decker and can serve only a tiny fraction of the destinations.
> The tram runs between the city centre and the airport, but regular
> travellers know that bus 100 is faster and cheaper for that journey.


Ah yes, that famous bus 100 - was passing under our nose each time we
were waiting for another one, but we could not use it because it was
not accessible for people using the day travel ticket... Talk about
tariff integration !!!
Certes (28.08.2017, 18:44)
On 28/08/17 16:31, Marc Van Dyck wrote:
> Certes presented the following explanation :
> Ah yes, that famous bus 100 - was passing under our nose each time we
> were waiting for another one, but we could not use it because it was
> not accessible for people using the day travel ticket... Talk about
> tariff integration !!!


For the locals, there's bus 35 which sneaks into the airport without a
premium fare and accepts day tickets. It takes a circuitous route and
has some of the oldest buses in the otherwise modern fleet.
rob499 (30.08.2017, 12:30)
On Monday, 28 August 2017 17:44:50 UTC+1, Certes wrote:
> On 28/08/17 16:31, Marc Van Dyck wrote:
> For the locals, there's bus 35 which sneaks into the airport without a
> premium fare and accepts day tickets. It takes a circuitous route and
> has some of the oldest buses in the otherwise modern fleet.


Edinburgh/Lothian Buses seem to think that travel to/from the airport should attract a premium fare. While this view about airport travel is common, I'm not convinced that it's helpful.

Rob.
Roland Perry (30.08.2017, 12:43)
In message <b5ad6a6a-62ae-4fb6-98e8-1f91639c4051>, at
03:30:19 on Wed, 30 Aug 2017, rob499 remarked:

>Edinburgh/Lothian Buses seem to think that travel to/from the airport
>should attract a premium fare. While this view about airport travel is
>common, I'm not convinced that it's helpful.


Helpful to whom? As a tourist tax it's commonplace across the world.
tim... (30.08.2017, 13:22)
"Roland Perry" <roland> wrote in message
news:famn
> In message <vk96qch7a2vcg0364oh9naf38ld1hpjeic>, at 21:09:27 on
> Sun, 27 Aug 2017, Scott <newsgroups> remarked:
> What other stations on *existing* lines have been re-opened (if we want to
> compare like with like)?


IIRC Dyce station exceed expectations a short time after opening (I can't
find anything to confirm that though)

tim
Jeremy Double (30.08.2017, 23:34)
Roland Perry <roland> wrote:
> In message <b5ad6a6a-62ae-4fb6-98e8-1f91639c4051>, at
> 03:30:19 on Wed, 30 Aug 2017, rob499 remarked:
>> Edinburgh/Lothian Buses seem to think that travel to/from the airport
>> should attract a premium fare. While this view about airport travel is
>> common, I'm not convinced that it's helpful.

> Helpful to whom? As a tourist tax it's commonplace across the world.


Geneva airport goes the other way and within the baggage reclaim area
provides free public transport tickets for use within the metropolitan
area, or at least it did last time I was there. As a quid pro quo for the
tourist tax on hotel stays there, you are provided with a free public
transport ticket for the period of the stay.
Roland Perry (30.08.2017, 23:43)
In message
<1239760115.525821511.327082.jmd.nospam-btinternet.com
t>, at 21:34:31 on Wed, 30 Aug 2017, Jeremy Double
<jmd.nospam> remarked:

>Geneva airport goes the other way and within the baggage reclaim area
>provides free public transport tickets for use within the metropolitan
>area, or at least it did last time I was there. As a quid pro quo for the
>tourist tax on hotel stays there, you are provided with a free public
>transport ticket for the period of the stay.


Yes, they do things differently in Switzerland (including subsidising
the heavy rail 5x as much per passenger mile as we do).

In the absence of a tooth fairy, the cost of the "while you are here"
transport ticket will inevitably be bundled into your hotel bill.

I understand that the main reason for all of this is to reduce the
congestion/pollution from taxi-traffic (the airport is also quite hard
to get to by road if you aren't a bus/tram, as another disincentive).

As a result of this, the few taxis which do manage to make a living
charge hair-raising prices!
rob499 (31.08.2017, 11:34)
On Wednesday, 30 August 2017 11:49:33 UTC+1, Roland Perry wrote:
> In message <b5ad6a6a-62ae-4fb6-98e8-1f91639c4051>, at
> 03:30:19 on Wed, 30 Aug 2017, rob499 remarked:
> Helpful to whom? As a tourist tax it's commonplace across the world.
> --
> Roland Perry


Getting people to use public transport to reach airports, thus reducing congestion and carbon emissions.

Rob.
Ian Batten (31.08.2017, 11:52)
On Thursday, 31 August 2017 10:34:21 UTC+1, rob...@hotmail.com wrote:
> On Wednesday, 30 August 2017 11:49:33 UTC+1, Roland Perry wrote:
> Getting people to use public transport to reach airports, thus reducing congestion and carbon emissions.


Well, assuming they were going to fly. If you make travel by plane sufficiently
tricky, they might switch to (say) high-speed rail, which reduces carbon emissions
rather more than worrying about the access to the airheads.

ian
rob499 (31.08.2017, 12:33)
On Thursday, 31 August 2017 10:52:56 UTC+1, Ian Batten wrote:
> On Thursday, 31 August 2017 10:34:21 UTC+1, rob...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Well, assuming they were going to fly. If you make travel by plane sufficiently
> tricky, they might switch to (say) high-speed rail, which reduces carbon emissions
> rather more than worrying about the access to the airheads.
> ian


I doubt that the additional fare to Edinburgh Airport would make the difference; journey time and fare from Waverley v Airport and convenience of destination station/airport are much more likely to be relevant. As for international travel, the airport has a virtual monopoly and I would rather the arriving passengers bought a Ridacard and used the tram (and carried on usingpublic transport during their stay).

Rob
Roland Perry (31.08.2017, 16:32)
In message <8679be4b-4495-4313-893a-2fde794131c8>, at
02:34:18 on Thu, 31 Aug 2017, rob499 remarked:
>On Wednesday, 30 August 2017 11:49:33 UTC+1, Roland Perry wrote:
>Getting people to use public transport to reach airports, thus reducing
>congestion and carbon emissions.


It's a very niche market to throw a lot of "environment-preserving"
resource at; the money is better being collected from the tourists and
deployed to encourage the local populace to use trainsmore.
Graeme Wall (31.08.2017, 17:31)
On 31/08/2017 10:52, Ian Batten wrote:
> On Thursday, 31 August 2017 10:34:21 UTC+1, rob...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Well, assuming they were going to fly. If you make travel by plane sufficiently
> tricky, they might switch to (say) high-speed rail, which reduces carbon emissions
> rather more than worrying about the access to the airheads.


The thought of using high speed rail to get to Buenos Aires is
attractive but somewhat improbable.
Nick Leverton (31.08.2017, 17:36)
In article <oo99sg$e6s$1>,
Graeme Wall <rail> wrote:
>On 31/08/2017 10:52, Ian Batten wrote:
>carbon emissions.
>The thought of using high speed rail to get to Buenos Aires is
>attractive but somewhat improbable.


A Transatlantic Tunnel, hurrah !

Nick
Sam Wilson (31.08.2017, 18:37)
On 2017-08-27 16:57:37 +0000, Marc Van Dyck said:

> Roland Perry explained on 27/08/2017 :
> As is the tram going over there too, it seems. I have been there for
> a few days last week and never saw more than 10-15 people on any tram
> that crossed my way. Meanwhile, the buses were packed to capacity.
> Why's that ?


It depends very much on the time of day. At the weekend the trams are
full and standing (not difficult - they don't have a huge number of
seats) with people travelling to and from the park and ride site at
Ingliston.

Sam
Sam Wilson (31.08.2017, 18:43)
On 2017-08-27 20:24:44 +0000, R. Mark Clayton said:

> On Sunday, 27 August 2017 17:57:40 UTC+1, Marc Van Dyck wrote:
> The whole Edinburgh tram project was a total fiasco from start to
> finish and is still badly run at a huge loss (small operating profit,
> but nearly a billion in debt).


Disregarding the sunk costs (and the effects on cyclists which
hopefully they'll be doing something about), it actually works quite
well.

> Easy 5 surcharge price gouge to go to the airport on the tram.
> Arriving tourists may pay it - locals and those who have sussed it out
> while staying rarely do.


Locals who have the Scottish over-60s bus pass seem to rather like it.

Sam

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