ukclique > railway

Jeremy Double (19.09.2017, 20:03)
tim... <tims_new_home> wrote:
[..]
> so I really do not believe you when you say that it's impossible to put a
> deep bored tunnel in this location if you select the route sensibly
> Other countries have done it


Yes, there are underground metro systems in both Prague and Lisbon, both of
which have considerable hills, and I have already mentioned the Stuttgart
main line project. Of course, Stuttgart also has an underground metro
system and large hills (in fact, its urban rail system includes one of the
four rack railways in Germany).
Roland Perry (19.09.2017, 20:36)
In message
<719049933.527536760.586763.jmd.nospam-btinternet.com
>, at 18:03:14 on Tue, 19 Sep 2017, Jeremy Double <jmd.nospam> remarked:
>> so I really do not believe you when you say that it's impossible to put a
>> deep bored tunnel in this location if you select the route sensibly
>> Other countries have done it

>Yes, there are underground metro systems in both Prague and Lisbon, both of
>which have considerable hills,


My recollection is that Prague has some *very* deep [53m apparently]
escalators in parts of its system, which are only just sub-surface (or
sub-Vltava) at other places. Similarly Lisbon has stretches of metro in
the suburbs which are above surface, as well as a deepest station of
45metres.

By comparison, Westminster is "only" 39m deep and of course we have our
own "because of a hill" deepest under the surface station at Hampstead,
58m.
Anna Noyd-Dryver (19.09.2017, 20:38)
Ian Batten <i.g.batten> wrote:
> There are canals in many other British city centres. None of them have 20 lock
> falls in the space of a couple of miles.


I thought Manchester might be a competitor, but 20 locks takes you 3 miles
there ;)

Anna Noyd-Dryver
Ian Batten (19.09.2017, 21:40)
On Tuesday, 19 September 2017 19:03:17 UTC+1, Jeremy Double wrote:
> tim... <tims_new_home> wrote:
> Yes, there are underground metro systems in both Prague and Lisbon, both of
> which have considerable hills,


Prague I have been to but cannot remember much about, but Lisbon I know well.

Look at the physical metro map:



Now, imagine you are walking down Liberdade, towards the sea.
You pass, for example, Restauradores and Rossio, which indeed are
on the subway. See that big hill to your right, up towards the elevator?
See that big hill up to your left, up to the Castello? How do you get there
on the subway? Oh, you don't. Odd, that. The metro is a cut and cover
under the main roads, and runs along the gentle slope down to the sea.
It doesn't cover the hilly bits.

ian
Ian Batten (19.09.2017, 21:42)
On Tuesday, 19 September 2017 17:15:19 UTC+1, Roland Perry wrote:
> In message <a467f2f3-b68c-4247-b1e9-0286333500b8>, at
> 05:56:04 on Tue, 19 Sep 2017, Ian Batten <i.g.batten>
> remarked:
> 21 locks from Aldersley Junction to Wolverhampton railway station
> Unless you count Wolverhampton as a separate city :)
> Tardebigge is 30 locks in just over two miles, up another side of the same
> hill, but you'd be hard pressed to call that or Lapworth (25 locks) in a
> city.


That's because Birmingham's hills are all on high ground. It's a drop
in every direction off the plateau. It might be partly psychological,
but as you drive up the M5 from Bristol or the M6 from Rugby you
always feel that the general tendency is uphill.

ian
Graeme Wall (23.09.2017, 12:00)
On 19/09/2017 14:13, Ian Batten wrote:
> On Tuesday, 19 September 2017 13:56:07 UTC+1, Ian Batten wrote:
> a further 40', making a total of 120'. My bad.


There's also the geology to take into account. London is famously
easier to tunnel under than other places, Birmingham is well west of the
Tees-Exe line.

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