ukclique > food+drink.* > food+drink.misc

Brian Reay (11.09.2017, 21:06)
My wife and I enjoyed an excellent leg of lamb lunch today, which led to
a conversation about the eating of lamb etc in general. (It is one of
our regular meals, although this meal was in a restaurant.)

A couple of matters came up which we are curious about.

We both recall our respective mothers using a cut of lamb (or perhaps
mutton) called 'lap'. We think it was used to make stews, so
presumably, it was a cheaper cut. We've not seen this cut in the shops
in our memory of buying meat (40 years or so) but, I assume it must have
been available at least towards the beginning of that period.

Does anyone know what 'Lap' is?

As for Mutton, other than a traditional pie in Scotland (which should
have been Mutton), I've not knowingly had Mutton or even seen it
available for a long as I can remember.

There was a comment on R4 recently that efforts were to me made to
encourage the sale of Mutton, so I assume it is either not sold or only
in limited quantities.

Has anyone seen Mutton for sale recently?
Malcolm Loades (11.09.2017, 21:53)
On 11/09/2017 20:06, Brian Reay wrote:
..
> Has anyone seen Mutton for sale recently?


Look no further than an Indian owned shop. My local one sells both
mutton and goat.

Mutton back chops are a staple in our house for curries such as Rogan
Josh. Meat cooked on the bone tastes so much better than diced stuff
and is much more like food served in India. I've not cooked one but the
local Indian shop I referred to always has whole legs of mutton
available as well.

Malcolm

PS I've no idea what Lap is but the two cheapest cuts are breast and
neck (also called scrag end). We had Lancashire Hotpot for dinner
tonight using scrag end with a couple of lamb's kidneys tucked in.
Brian Reay (12.09.2017, 11:22)
On 11/09/17 20:53, Malcolm Loades wrote:
[..]
> PS I've no idea what Lap is but the two cheapest cuts are breast and
> neck (also called scrag end). We had Lancashire Hotpot for dinner
> tonight using scrag end with a couple of lamb's kidneys tucked in.


Thank you, including for the goat tip. I tried goat in Pakistan and
enjoyed it. I've wanted to try cooking it but never thought of trying an
Indian shop etc.

Lancashire Hotpot is a family favourite but, unfortunately, I am the
only person who will eat kidneys. I have a similar issue with liver,
which I really like.

As for Lap, I contacted someone else and it seems it is Lamb Breast-
which is fatty.I assume a bit like pork belly (another family favourite-
cooked slowly on a bed of apples, sage, and onions).
Malcolm Loades (12.09.2017, 16:15)
On 12/09/2017 10:22, Brian Reay wrote:
> As for Lap, I contacted someone else and it seems it is Lamb Breast-
> which is fatty.I assume a bit like pork belly (another family favourite-
> cooked slowly on a bed of apples, sage, and onions).


IMHO there's only one thing to do with breast of lamb ...... 'Lamb
breast St Menehould'. It's magnificent! A good recipe and method here


Malcolm
Brian Reay (12.09.2017, 19:24)
On 12/09/17 15:15, Malcolm Loades wrote:
> On 12/09/2017 10:22, Brian Reay wrote:
> IMHO there's only one thing to do with breast of lamb ...... 'Lamb
> breast St Menehould'. It's magnificent! A good recipe and method here
>
> Malcolm


Thank you, I have saved it. While I normally shy away from things coated
in bread crumbs (they always remind me of convenience food- sorry), that
one does look rather good.

I can't recall what my mother used lap for (at least in detail, just
vaguely some kind of stew). My wife recalls her mother making something
with a white sauce, also stew like. Neither mother is alive to ask.

We enjoy lamb shanks quite often, I cook them in red wine with
anchovies. I think the anchovy idea came from a Nigel Slater recipe,
either way it is very good.
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