ukclique > railway

tolly57 (01.01.1970, 02:00)
-Yesterdays Metro reported that a guard stole a drunk passenger's
wallet and pin from Ockendon station and used his card 12 times
to withdraw 640. He disclosed his pin to her to as he was
incapable to use a ticket machine to purchase a ticket. She was
prosecuted at Basildon magistrates court. 150 hours unpaid work
and repay the cash. Call this justice?

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tolly57 (01.01.1970, 02:00)
"tim..." <tims_new_home> Wrote in message:
> "tolly57" <tolly57> wrote in message
> news:38g1
> and a criminal record
> and loss of employment
> tim


I'll grant you the loss of employment but they cannot care less
about the former. Look how many re-offend.
tim... (23.09.2017, 12:11)
"tolly57" <tolly57> wrote in message
news:38g1
> -Yesterdays Metro reported that a guard stole a drunk passenger's
> wallet and pin from Ockendon station and used his card 12 times
> to withdraw 640. He disclosed his pin to her to as he was
> incapable to use a ticket machine to purchase a ticket. She was
> prosecuted at Basildon magistrates court. 150 hours unpaid work
> and repay the cash. Call this justice?


and a criminal record

and loss of employment

tim
tim... (23.09.2017, 13:26)
"tolly57" <tolly57> wrote in message
news:b5e1
> "tim..." <tims_new_home> Wrote in message:
> I'll grant you the loss of employment but they cannot care less
> about the former. Look how many re-offend.


that's because the latter is caused by the former (oftentimes, when there is
no connection between the type of offence and the type of work being sought)

tim
Anna Noyd-Dryver (23.09.2017, 13:35)
tolly57 <tolly57> wrote:
> -Yesterdays Metro reported that a guard stole a drunk passenger's
> wallet and pin from Ockendon station and used his card 12 times
> to withdraw £640. He disclosed his pin to her to as he was
> incapable to use a ticket machine to purchase a ticket. She was
> prosecuted at Basildon magistrates court. 150 hours unpaid work
> and repay the cash. Call this justice?


The sub-headline says 'guard'. The third paragraph clarifies that this
person was a **security guard** not a member of traincrew.

Anna Noyd-Dryver
Certes (23.09.2017, 15:00)
On 23/09/17 11:35, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
> tolly57 <tolly57> wrote:
> The sub-headline says 'guard'. The third paragraph clarifies that this
> person was a **security guard** not a member of traincrew.
> Anna Noyd-Dryver


Thanks for clarifying that, Anna. It's comforting to know that we can
still trust the train crew. I think everyone here knows that private
security guards can vary in quality; maybe this incident will make
someone think twice before deploying them.
Rupert Moss-Eccardt (23.09.2017, 15:38)
On 23 Sep 2017 13:00, Certes wrote:
> On 23/09/17 11:35, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
> Thanks for clarifying that, Anna. It's comforting to know that we can
> still trust the train crew. I think everyone here knows that private
> security guards can vary in quality; maybe this incident will make
> someone think twice before deploying them.


His conviction should be stored on the SIA system so he won't be able
to work in the industry again. That is the idea of the SIA. I'm not
sure of the SIA also monitor companies.
Martin Coffee (23.09.2017, 16:25)
On 23/09/17 09:57, tolly57 wrote:
> -Yesterdays Metro reported that a guard stole a drunk passenger's
> wallet and pin from Ockendon station and used his card 12 times
> to withdraw £640. He disclosed his pin to her to as he was
> incapable to use a ticket machine to purchase a ticket. She was
> prosecuted at Basildon magistrates court. 150 hours unpaid work
> and repay the cash. Call this justice?


No. A person in authority should always get a non-suspended prison
sentence.
Mark Goodge (23.09.2017, 19:38)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:25:42 +0100, Martin Coffee
<martin.coffee.252153> wrote:

>On 23/09/17 09:57, tolly57 wrote:
>No. A person in authority should always get a non-suspended prison
>sentence.


She hasn't got a suspended sentence. She's got a non-custodial
sentence of community service, which will have to be served, plus a
restitution order, which will have to be fulfilled.

For a theft of that value, community service is the starting point of
the sentencing guidelines. A guilty plea, and lack of previous
convictions, serve to move the punishment further down the scale. On
the other hand, the fact that the offender exploited a position of
trust serves to move the punishment up the scale. In this case, these
two aspects effectively balanced out, resulting in a sentence that is
pretty much right on the nail for this crime.

Mark
aurora (23.09.2017, 20:47)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 09:57:04 +0100 (GMT+01:00), tolly57
<tolly57> wrote:

>-Yesterdays Metro reported that a guard stole a drunk passenger's
> wallet and pin from Ockendon station and used his card 12 times
> to withdraw 640. He disclosed his pin to her to as he was
> incapable to use a ticket machine to purchase a ticket. She was
> prosecuted at Basildon magistrates court. 150 hours unpaid work
> and repay the cash. Call this justice?


Well yes! The financial compensation to the victim could have been
higher to reflect stress and inconvenience. But, overall the
punishment fitted the crime. The magistrate meted out appropriate
justice.
aurora (23.09.2017, 20:51)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 11:10:08 +0100 (GMT+01:00), tolly57
<tolly57> wrote:

>"tim..." <tims_new_home> Wrote in message:
>I'll grant you the loss of employment but they cannot care less
> about the former. Look how many re-offend.


So you want punishment for crimes the perp. might commit in the
future? He is not "many" .
aurora (23.09.2017, 20:53)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 13:00:30 +0100, Certes <none> wrote:

>On 23/09/17 11:35, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
>Thanks for clarifying that, Anna. It's comforting to know that we can
>still trust the train crew. I think everyone here knows that private
>security guards can vary in quality; maybe this incident will make
>someone think twice before deploying them.


+1
aurora (23.09.2017, 20:59)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 17:38:20 +0100, Mark Goodge
<usenet> wrote:

[..]
>trust serves to move the punishment up the scale. In this case, these
>two aspects effectively balanced out, resulting in a sentence that is
>pretty much right on the nail for this crime.

Absolutely agree with you Mark. The punishment should fit the crime.
I do not want my taxpayer pounds paying for the perp's bed and
breakfast while she learns to be a real criminal.
BirchangerKen (23.09.2017, 21:19)
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 13:00:30 +0100, Certes <none> wrote:

>On 23/09/17 11:35, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
>Thanks for clarifying that, Anna. It's comforting to know that we can
>still trust the train crew. I think everyone here knows that private
>security guards can vary in quality; maybe this incident will make
>someone think twice before deploying them.


You can't always trust train crew, or the railway can't, anyway. Not
too long ago a husband and wife were prosecuted for a fiddle on
Stansted Express. I think they were reselling used tickets. I was a
regular on the line then, and think I knew them. Always very pleasant
and helpful to the passengers.

And then there was an infamous buffet steward on the LS-Cambridge
trains in the years just prior to electrification. He was always
pushing scratchcards, which I'm fairly certain were not supplied to
him by Travellers Fare. I wouldn't have minded if they'd been in date,
but they rarely were.

But he was a character, full of witty repartee, and made train travel
a more pleasant experience.
tim... (23.09.2017, 21:49)
"BirchangerKen" <ken> wrote in message
news:p1v6
[..]
> pushing scratchcards, which I'm fairly certain were not supplied to
> him by Travellers Fare. I wouldn't have minded if they'd been in date,
> but they rarely were.


whilst that might have been against the conditions of his employment

ISTM that it doesn't fall into the criminal category

tim

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