ukclique > railway

Joyce Whitchurch (25.08.2017, 13:31)
WARNO UP DOWN
BOLTON
SALFORD CRESCENT
CIRCUMA FURNO
WALNUT REDE

which being loosely translated from the original Telegraphese means that all lines are blocked between Bolton and Salford Crescent because of an incident at Moses Gate. All trains must be diverted to alternative routes unti further notice. Please arrange and advise all concerned. Make all necessary arrangements, as far as you are concerned.

Or you can look at NRES: <http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/today.aspx>.

The lines are blocked already for engineering work in connection with a) electrification, and b) restoration of Bolton's Platform 5. However, a nearbywater main burst last week and caused a cutting slope to collapse onto thedown main line. An adjacent overbridge (road over rail) was also affected and is looking very dodgy. Network Rail reckon it could take a further fortnight to effect repairs and hand the line back to traffic.

There are some interesting pictures on the Bolton News website at <http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/15480139.VIDEO__Water_gushes_onto_railway_line_aft er_burst_main_closes_road/> and <http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/15481142.Large_crack_appears_in_closed_road_bridge _after_massive_water_mains_burst/>.

Northern's website has some details of revised train and bus services for this week and (scroll down) next week: <https://www.northernrailway.co.uk/news/improvements/1294-route-improvement-work-around-bolton>. There will be trains at Bolton but only on the line to Blackburn and Clitheroe. It is not clear why the line from Bolton to Preston via Chorley won't see any trains (and neither will Westhoughton).
R. Mark Clayton (25.08.2017, 15:03)
On Friday, 25 August 2017 12:31:13 UTC+1, Joyce Whitchurch wrote:
[..]
> KIPPER
> J WHITCHURCH
> S STALYBRIDGE


Yes all over their web site: -

Mike Tomlinson (25.08.2017, 15:24)
En el artículo <04688e4b-6e97-4f41-9f65-01148d5f1c68>,
Joyce Whitchurch <joyce.whitchurch> escribió:

>CIRCUMA FURNO


What is this? Google doesn't bring me any enlightenment.
Joyce Whitchurch (25.08.2017, 17:18)
On Friday, 25 August 2017 14:26:16 UTC+1, Mike Tomlinson wrote:
> >CIRCUMA FURNO

> What is this? Google doesn't bring me any enlightenment.


They are railway telegraphic code words, of which WARNPASS is the best remembered - "Mishap has occurred at undermentioned station. Exhibit delay notice and warn passengers booking of possible delay".

CIRCUMA = "Trains must be diverted to alternative route(s)". FURNO = "Until further notice".

One of these days I will get round to publishing my web version of the code book.
MB (25.08.2017, 17:21)
I remember this happening, I thought it might be a repeat when I saw the
headline.

The old mines can still spell disaster

spuorgelgoog (25.08.2017, 18:11)
On Friday, 25 August 2017 14:26:16 UTC+1, Mike Tomlinson wrote:
> >CIRCUMA FURNO

> What is this? Google doesn't bring me any enlightenment.


It's a very early form of SGML used in the API for the HCI on the British Railway network

Owain
Mike Tomlinson (25.08.2017, 19:30)
En el artículo <84bd7f75-bebf-4281-a3d5-23992b6e75ea>,
Joyce Whitchurch <joyce.whitchurch> escribió:

>They are railway telegraphic code words, of which WARNPASS is the best
>remembered - "Mishap has occurred at undermentioned station. Exhibit delay
>notice and warn passengers booking of possible delay".
>CIRCUMA = "Trains must be diverted to alternative route(s)". FURNO = "Until
>further notice".


Fabulous. Thank you.

"circuma furno" looked vaguely Latin, but now I can see that "furno" is
"further notice". Wouldn't have worked out "circuma" though.

Is this shorthand still in common use on the railways?

>One of these days I will get round to publishing my web version of the code
>book.


I'd love to see it.
PhilD (25.08.2017, 20:46)
On Friday, 25 August 2017 16:18:13 UTC+1, Joyce Whitchurch wrote:
> One of these days I will get round to publishing my web version of the code book.


In the mean time, you might like
Joyce Whitchurch (25.08.2017, 21:40)
On Friday, 25 August 2017 18:30:47 UTC+1, Mike Tomlinson wrote:
> "circuma furno" looked vaguely Latin, but now I can see that "furno" is
> "further notice". Wouldn't have worked out "circuma" though.


Some of the code words are obvious contractions of common phrases, e.g. DERAIL - "Send quickly breakdown van, crane and gang; following derailed at (insert place and time)", but most are seemingly random jumbles of just-pronounceable letters.

> Is this shorthand still in common use on the railways?


Not officially, and vehemently never where safety-critical communications are concerned. But among staff of a certain vintage it lingers on in casual conversation. If you work in Control, or in train planning, you tend to pick these things up as railway slang. WARNPASS is the most frequently found, and I've even seen it scribbled on blackboards for the bewilderment of the travelling public. The follow-up code, one hoped, was RESUMP - "Cancel 'Warnpass' message. Working now in order."

Not uncommon still are codes like WALNUT - "Arrange and advise all concerned" - and its invariable running mate, REDE - "Make all necessary arrangements as far as you are concerned". The proper response was WILLOW - "I will make all necessary arrangements".

ADEX of course means "Additional Day Excursion", unless it's a private charter, in which case it's PARSPEC - "Un-advertised Party Special".

SILK survives in the "SILK Arrangement" - ".... here without funds. Can youcall at undermentioned address and collect fare, plus expenses as follows.Wire result at once."

ARROW - "Reply by wire on following subject" - seems to have stuck around despite the demise of marshalling yards. It was usually the prefix to an enquiry about a missing wagon or parcel, a topic to which the code book had todevote no fewer than three pages.

GOSLING and GOOSE were similarly bound up with marshalling yards - "Hold back following until further advised", "Stop accepting following until further advised".

I suppose the longest survivors though are codes that we don't immediately think of as code words at all. They cover coaches and wagons, e.g. FK - First Corridor; BCK - Brake Composite Corridor; RMB - Miniature Buffet Car; GUV - General Utility Van; POS - Post Office Sorting Van; BG - Bogie van withGangway; and of course, the shoals of SHARKs, HERRINGs, MACKEREL, PILCHARDs, MERMAIDs, HADDOCKs, DOLPHINs, STURGEONs, SALMON etc, mostly run by the Chief Civil Engineer.

My favourite code word though has always been FUNCO - "Vehicle with funeralparty and corpse".
ColinR (25.08.2017, 22:52)
On 25/08/2017 16:18, Joyce Whitchurch wrote:

> One of these days I will get round to publishing my web version of the code book.


Codes can cause problems if they are not understood. Many years ago I
worked on the BR ferries to the Channel Islands. There was a code used
to alert the mainland police of a need for their attendance on arrival
with codes going from A to E (I cannot recall which way round but
ranging from minor to "bring the riot squad").

In Weymouth the relevant police force was the BTP, in Portsmouth it was
Hampshire Constabulary. We had a minor problem on one vessel going to
Portsmouth and requested minor police attendance. However, unknown to
us, the codes used by BTP and Hampshire were opposite to each other so
we got the full riot squad attendance ..... oops!
Neil Williams (27.08.2017, 11:56)
On 2017-08-25 19:40:05 +0000, Joyce Whitchurch said:

> BG - Bogie van with Gangway


That I didn't know, I always thought it was "Brake Guard".

Neil
Joyce Whitchurch (27.08.2017, 17:57)
There were lots of codes for brake vans, to distinguish between coaching stock and freight, gangwayed or not, 4, 6 or 8 wheels etc. The BG is the mostfamiliar to us now because it was the only full brake suitable for InterCity use until the DVT came along. (Lots of half brakes of course: BSO, BFK etc.)
Anna Noyd-Dryver (31.08.2017, 23:55)
Mike Tomlinson <mike> wrote:
> En el artículo <84bd7f75-bebf-4281-a3d5-23992b6e75ea>,
> Joyce Whitchurch <joyce.whitchurch> escribió:
> Fabulous. Thank you.
> "circuma furno" looked vaguely Latin, but now I can see that "furno" is
> "further notice". Wouldn't have worked out "circuma" though.
> Is this shorthand still in common use on the railways?


CAPED is common-ish slang (though usually what is meant is PINED) - also it
has become a word in its own right, e.g. "We might have to cape that",
rather in the same way as SPAD has become a word "who spadded that
signal?".

Absent a list to compare with, I think that's it. FURNO has been replaced
by UFN (no, not Unpaid Fare Notice).

Demic is not, I think, an ex-telegraph word.

Anna Noyd-Dryver
Joyce Whitchurch (01.09.2017, 11:51)
Network Rail now expect to return both lines to traffic for start of service on Wednesday next. I'm told there'll be a 20 mph TSR though, which won't help performance.
Anna Noyd-Dryver (02.09.2017, 10:06)
PhilD <phildeaves> wrote:
> On Friday, 25 August 2017 16:18:13 UTC+1, Joyce Whitchurch wrote:
>> One of these days I will get round to publishing my web version of the code book.

> In the mean time, you might like


Spate has become a word. Some of the restricted clearance/out of gauge load
words (e.g. OPPOS, and others I can't check now) were published in the WON
regarding the initial runs of class 800, though I'm not sure quite what the
purpose of this was.

My favourite from that list is "LOUGH Shunting horse ill. Send relief.".

Anna Noyd-Dryver

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