ukclique > food+drink.* > food+drink.misc

Brian Reay (03.03.2019, 11:18)
I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday. What a I have been
missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
(they seem to be a definite red line for her).

I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
garden. It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)
Ophelia (03.03.2019, 11:24)
"Brian Reay" wrote in message news:fc81

I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday. What a I have been
missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
(they seem to be a definite red line for her).

I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
garden. It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)

==

Eww the slime makes me shudder.
Brian Reay (03.03.2019, 11:49)
On 03/03/2019 09:24, Ophelia wrote:
> "Brian Reay"  wrote in message news:fc81
> I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday.  What a I have been
> missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
> (they seem to be a definite red line for her).
>  I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
> favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
> garden.  It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
> edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)
> ==
> Eww the slime makes me shudder.


There is no slime when they are cooked.

True, if you collect / prepare them there would be some.

I don't know how ready they are to cook when you buy them. Watching the
Ramsey video, it takes a few days of preparation (washing and feeding on
known food- carrots) before you can cook them.

I doubt I will ever cook them myself but I will certainly look for them
on a menu.

Oddly, I'm not a great fan a shell fish. Crab, lobster yes, prawns,
scallops, yes. But the others, in general, I would avoid.
Ophelia (03.03.2019, 16:10)
"Brian Reay" wrote in message news:o481

On 03/03/2019 09:24, Ophelia wrote:
> "Brian Reay" wrote in message news:fc81
> I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday. What a I have been
> missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
> (they seem to be a definite red line for her).
> I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
> favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
> garden. It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
> edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)
> ==
> Eww the slime makes me shudder.


There is no slime when they are cooked.

True, if you collect / prepare them there would be some.

I don't know how ready they are to cook when you buy them. Watching the
Ramsey video, it takes a few days of preparation (washing and feeding on
known food- carrots) before you can cook them.

I doubt I will ever cook them myself but I will certainly look for them
on a menu.

Oddly, I'm not a great fan a shell fish. Crab, lobster yes, prawns,
scallops, yes. But the others, in general, I would avoid.
Malcolm Loades (03.03.2019, 16:36)
How were they served?

If it was the 'usual' way in garlic butter could you actually detect an
identifiable snail flavour. I find them simply a texture.

Reminds me of my son, aged 5 or 6 at the time, who tried one of my
snails in garlic butter when we were in France. "Do you like that I
asked?" "I like the snail juice" was his reply!

Malcolm

PS Google "Miners' Arms in Priddy" and you can read how this pub used
to serve up 4,000 local Mendip snails a year in the 60's
Kev (04.03.2019, 00:30)
On 03/03/2019 09:18, Brian Reay wrote:
> I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday.  What a I have been
> missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
> (they seem to be a definite red line for her).
>  I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
> favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
> garden.  It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
> edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)


Not a fan myself - always found them too chewy for my taste - a bit like
whelks.

When my son was a toddler, I remember coming up to him in the garden and
finding a crushed shell in his mitt and slime all round his mouth - he
didn't seem to come to any harm from it :P
Brian Reay (04.03.2019, 16:12)
On 03/03/2019 14:36, Malcolm Loades wrote:
> How were they served?
> If it was the 'usual' way in garlic butter could you actually detect an
> identifiable snail flavour.  I find them simply a texture.


With garlic and parsley.

I can't pretend the 'meat' had any definite taste. They weren't
'rubbery', which is what I expected.

Certainly no 'slime' but some nice liquid they'd been cooked in (I
assume). I didn't count how many were in the serving but, at an
estimate, around 10.
Ophelia (04.03.2019, 18:21)
"Kev" wrote in message news:4765

On 03/03/2019 09:18, Brian Reay wrote:
> I tried Escargot for the first time on Friday. What a I have been
> missing! Now the challenge is the get Senior Management to try them
> (they seem to be a definite red line for her).
> I even ventured onto YouTube where Gordon Ramsey (one of my least
> favourite TV chefs) collects, prepares, and cooks snails from his London
> garden. It seems English Snails are a different type but not less
> edible. (No, I've not tried them yet.)


Not a fan myself - always found them too chewy for my taste - a bit like
whelks.

When my son was a toddler, I remember coming up to him in the garden and
finding a crushed shell in his mitt and slime all round his mouth - he
didn't seem to come to any harm from it :P

==

ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww
Brian Reay (04.03.2019, 21:21)
On 04/03/2019 16:21, Ophelia wrote:
> "Kev"  wrote in message news:4765
> On 03/03/2019 09:18, Brian Reay wrote:
> Not a fan myself - always found them too chewy for my taste - a bit like
> whelks.
> When my son was a toddler, I remember coming up to him in the garden and
> finding a crushed shell in his mitt and slime all round his mouth - he
> didn't seem to come to any harm from it :P
> ==
> ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww


It is best not to think about what (your) children may have eaten as
toddlers as they played in the garden etc. ;-)
Ophelia (04.03.2019, 23:15)
"Brian Reay" wrote in message news:1uu1

On 04/03/2019 16:21, Ophelia wrote:
> "Kev" wrote in message news:4765
> On 03/03/2019 09:18, Brian Reay wrote:
> Not a fan myself - always found them too chewy for my taste - a bit like
> whelks.
> When my son was a toddler, I remember coming up to him in the garden and
> finding a crushed shell in his mitt and slime all round his mouth - he
> didn't seem to come to any harm from it :P
> ==
> ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww


It is best not to think about what (your) children may have eaten as
toddlers as they played in the garden etc. ;-)

==

lol yes. Well those days are long gone thank goodness :)
spuorgelgoog (05.03.2019, 22:10)
On Monday, 4 March 2019 21:15:09 UTC, Ophelia wrote:
> > It is best not to think about what (your) children may have eaten as
> > toddlers as they played in the garden etc. ;-)

> lol yes. Well those days are long gone thank goodness :)


If Alzheimer's strikes you may find yourself trying to eat all sorts of things again.

Apparently ice is quite popular, but patients trying to eat their hearing aids is not unknown.

Owain
Ophelia (05.03.2019, 23:08)
wrote in message
news:4623

On Monday, 4 March 2019 21:15:09 UTC, Ophelia wrote:
> > It is best not to think about what (your) children may have eaten as
> > toddlers as they played in the garden etc. ;-)

> lol yes. Well those days are long gone thank goodness :)


If Alzheimer's strikes you may find yourself trying to eat all sorts of
things again.

Apparently ice is quite popular, but patients trying to eat their hearing
aids is not unknown.

Owain
Keema's Nan (05.03.2019, 23:36)
On 4 Mar 2019, Brian Reay wrote
(in article <q5jtrr$1uu$1>):

> On 04/03/2019 16:21, Ophelia wrote:
> It is best not to think about what (your) children may have eaten as
> toddlers as they played in the garden etc. ;-)


No, maybe not - but that still doesn’t tempt me to try snails.

I think the whole idea of what I was eating would make me gag. It would be
the same with eating insects or caterpillars.

I have survived without them for many decades, and am not about to try them
now.
Brian Reay (06.03.2019, 14:05)
On 05/03/19 21:36, Keema's Nan wrote:
> On 4 Mar 2019, Brian Reay wrote
> (in article <q5jtrruu>):
> No, maybe not - but that still doesn’t tempt me to try snails.
> I think the whole idea of what I was eating would make me gag. It would be
> the same with eating insects or caterpillars.
> I have survived without them for many decades, and am not about to try them
> now.


I'm not tempted try insects etc but there are 'strange' foods to
British/English people that others eat and regard as perfectly normal,
if not special treats. In Jordan, I tried Sheep brain, a bit like pate.
People probably wouldn't eat goat here but I've tried it in both Jordan
and Pakistan. Also Horse in France. I enjoyed the goat, the horse was
nothing special.
graham (06.03.2019, 20:00)
On 2019-03-06 5:05 a.m., Brian Reay wrote:
> On 05/03/19 21:36, Keema's Nan wrote:
> I'm not tempted try insects etc but there are 'strange' foods to
> British/English people that others eat and regard as perfectly normal,
> if not special treats. In Jordan, I tried Sheep brain, a bit like pate.


45 years ago I lived in Australia and sheep's brains were readily
available in the supermarkets. I would blanch them, then put them in
small bowls with garlic butter and pop them under the grill. My late
F-I-L raved about them done this way.
In those days, one could buy pured brains in those little Heinz baby
food jars. So we made are own for our son.

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