ukclique > business.* > business.agriculture

Derek Moody (11.12.2018, 12:10)
In article <puk0bn$1cbb$1>, Old Codger
<URL:mailto:oldcodger> wrote:
> On 07/12/2018 13:37, Derek Moody wrote:
> > In article <pu9hbt$1jv8$1>, Old Codger
> > <URL:mailto:oldcodger> wrote:
> >> On 04/12/2018 16:19, Derek Moody wrote:


> I think you are being too kind to the PM Derek. Her biggest mistake, to
> my mind, was to start by saying "Brexit means Brexit" and then seemingly
> accept all Brussels demands. We needed a hard man in charge right from
> the beginning who would start by saying we were coming out and not
> offering any recompense to the EU. This would put the EU on the back
> foot and make them negotiate rather than us being the supplicant. May
> though made a number of significant offers for nothing in return before
> negotiations started.


I agree with the main sentiment - we should have left unilaterally the
morning after the referendum saying 'Article 50 only applies to members -
not us beecause we just left.' and got on with it; Cameron hadn't made any
preparations so resigned and dropped May into it after leaving enough time
that remoaners had already started tying her hands and trying to upset the
result meaning she was always on a hiding to nothing.

Brexit means - well, it's a nasty eurocentric coinage, I prefer 'Brelease'
or 'Brescape' - it means that we will be leaving in march under WTO rules
and then, finally, we can get on with making our own way again.

Cheerio,
AJH (11.12.2018, 12:47)
On Tue, 11 Dec 2018 10:10:53 -0000, Derek Moody <derek>
wrote:

> I agree with the main sentiment - we should have left unilaterally the
> morning after the referendum saying 'Article 50 only applies to members -
> not us beecause we just left.' and got on with it; Cameron hadn't made
> any
> preparations so resigned and dropped May into it after leaving enough
> time
> that remoaners had already started tying her hands and trying to upset
> the
> result meaning she was always on a hiding to nothing.


I don't like saying it and it seems strange to enter into a discussion
here but I take the same view Derek but that's hindsight, what next?

AJH
Derek Moody (17.12.2018, 02:43)
In article <op.ztutl7xhtwqie3@fraxinus>, AJH
<URL:mailto:news> wrote:

> I don't like saying it and it seems strange to enter into a discussion
> here but I take the same view Derek but that's hindsight, what next?


We leave (I hope) without any messy deals and after a brief period of media
induced panic it all turns out relatively OK as we muddle through and begin
to establish new relationships.

Most people will hardly remember it by Christmas '19 but for years anything
that goes even a little bit pear shaped will be used as evidence we shouldn't
have left.

The global trends are for a very uncomfortable world for the next few
generations at least but even when there is vaguely good news it will be
twisted:

For eg: In about 10 years self driving electric cars will be common but
most people won't own one as it will be much cheaper to summon a taxi to
your phone (no driver's wages) so only about 20% the current number of
cars will be needed - causing huge shakedowns in the motor industry -
which will be blamed on Brexit...

Cheerio,
maus (17.12.2018, 11:10)
On 2018-12-17, Derek Moody <derek> wrote:
[..]
> cars will be needed - causing huge shakedowns in the motor industry -
> which will be blamed on Brexit...
> Cheerio,


My main hope/worry in the meantime is that the british Army will take
over the Uk for a few years.

Remember, under present plans, the UK may suffer, but it will be worse
in the Republic. A lot of milk crosses the border every day, according
to what it is to be used for, will that milk have to be dumped?.

With a very reduced market for UK mutton, will the surplus be smuggled
across the Border to be butchered as Irish?

With UK beef production being sacrificed for cheap imports of dodgy
origin, what effect will that have on Irish farmers?.
Derek Moody (24.12.2018, 04:19)
In article <slrnq1eq01.1qu.mausg>, maus
<URL:mailto:mausg> wrote:

> My main hope/worry in the meantime is that the british Army will take
> over the Uk for a few years.


I don't think even the army is daft enough to try that one.

> Remember, under present plans, the UK may suffer, but it will be worse
> in the Republic. A lot of milk crosses the border every day, according
> to what it is to be used for, will that milk have to be dumped?.
> With a very reduced market for UK mutton, will the surplus be smuggled
> across the Border to be butchered as Irish?


There may be a few days idiocy just so the remainers can say 'I told you so'
but in the end there will be people with produce in one place, people
wanting to consume it in another and perfectly good international trade
rules to enable the two groups to dicker.

> With UK beef production being sacrificed for cheap imports of dodgy
> origin, what effect will that have on Irish farmers?.


Probably none in the medium term. There might be a few more forms to fill -
or different ones, but the UK food regulations are unlikely to change soon
and IF they were to be relaxed the media would have a field day - no
politician is going to risk that.

I guess you can start a new batch of steers safely knowing all will be
running smoothly before they finish and there's a good chance something will
be in place ready for the first of the april bobby calves...

If new producers come into play they will have to meet the current
regulations, incurring very similar costs and with much longer supply lines.

In the meanwhile, have a cool yule :-)

Cheerio,
mausg (24.12.2018, 10:54)
On 2018-12-24, Derek Moody <derek> wrote:
[..]
> regulations, incurring very similar costs and with much longer supply lines.
> In the meanwhile, have a cool yule :-)
> Cheerio,


I keep having a nightmare, the cattle (I have none now) have to be TB tested
and I am as I am now, semi-crippled, instead of how I was then, then I wake
up and its all a dream. The people that helped the first time we tested here
are dead now.

Anyway, to any UK friends, Happy Shortest day.

I find it hard to get my younger people to understand, the latest
mornings are still to come, while the later evenings are already here.

I used to work fffor a farmer who would only start feeding his (outdoor)
cattle after the New Year.
Derek Moody (27.12.2018, 19:02)
In article <slrnq217mt.18e.mausg>, <URL:mailto:mausg>
wrote:

> I keep having a nightmare, the cattle (I have none now) have to be TB tested
> and I am as I am now, semi-crippled, instead of how I was then, then I wake
> up and its all a dream. The people that helped the first time we tested here
> are dead now.


Don't eat cheese for supper ;-)

> Anyway, to any UK friends, Happy Shortest day.
> I find it hard to get my younger people to understand, the latest
> mornings are still to come, while the later evenings are already here.


Wikipedia has a good article on the equation of time. Anyone who has tried
navigating with a sextant will have had to apply it to watch time before the
noon sight or be many miles off.

> I used to work fffor a farmer who would only start feeding his (outdoor)
> cattle after the New Year.


I guess the available acreage, the soil and the weather dictate but there are
plenty this year looking to eke out grass for as long as possible.

Cheerio,
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