ukclique > telecom.* > telecom.mobile

Java Jive (07.03.2019, 20:07)
Has anyone else tried to pair via Bluetooth a Win 7 PC, Ultimate Edition
if it matters, and a Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 SM-T719, LTE edition? I can
link the two by USB cable, and copy data between the two, but now I have
a potential need to link the two by Bluetooth.

I authenticate between the two successfully, but then W7 complains that
it doesn't have drivers for three new devices labelled ...
Bluetooth Peripheral Device
.... and that it can't find them by searching the web. There are no
drivers on the Samsung support page for that device:


I've tried ringing Samsung support, but got a thicko who couldn't
understand why I would be ringing Samsung mobile support for Windows
drivers, and who wanted to transfer me to their Windows support, but I
wouldn't let him, saying that I had a Samsung tablet, not a Samsung PC.
Finally, he gave an email address for their technical support helpdesk,
I've emailed them, and received an acknowledgement, but as yet no useful
help.

In the meantime, has anyone else come up against this sort of problem
when pairing a W7 PC and a Samsung mobile, and can they suggest anything
to help?

TIA
pjp (07.03.2019, 21:32)
In article <q5rmlk$e9l$1>, java says...
[..]
> when pairing a W7 PC and a Samsung mobile, and can they suggest anything
> to help?
> TIA


I've tried to connect a couple of phones via Bluetooth to a 64 bit Win7
pc. They've all seemed to connect and even autenticate themselves (e.g.
code matches) but nothing else. I don't own a phone myself so it's only
been trial and experiment when I notice someone visiting has one with
Bluetooth.

What little research I've done suggesst Bluetooth is not very good over
any distance at all. Makes me wonder how good it'd work running these
Bluetooth speakers etc. outside on the patio with pc upstairs on
opposite side of house or in basement recroom etc.
Paul (07.03.2019, 21:57)
Java Jive wrote:
[..]
> when pairing a W7 PC and a Samsung mobile, and can they suggest anything
> to help?
> TIA


I presume your Device Manager shows a Bluetooth entry,
and there are no yellow marks ? Start : Run : devmgmt.msc
to have a Device Manager.

If you have an "Other Devices", and there is an unknown
entry, try doing Properties : Details : HardwareID and
Google the HardwareID and see if that's your Bluetooth
(sans drivers). Things show up in "Other Devices" instead
of in the Bluetooth entry, if they haven't received
Windows drivers yet. If you purchase a Bluetooth USB nano
unit, the driver CD is probably in the box it came in.
*Don't* purchase electronics without a driver CD!
The driver CD is proof the manufacturer gives a damn.

Once a BT driver is in place, Bluetooth uses a "stack". The
OSes will vary on where that stack comes from. On Win7,
I would guess you need the stack that came on the CD
with the Bluetooth device. If the Bluetooth is built
into the machine, was there from the beginning, check
the laptop website driver page, and see if there is a
Bluetooth stack to use for Win7.

I think Win10 has a Bluetooth stack as a built-in, but
one test case I ran on Win10 was a dismal failure. It
appeared they'd never considered the possibility of
running of PicoNet, between two machines...



Windows
* 1.4.1 Microsoft Bluetooth Stack
* 1.4.2 Broadcom WIDCOMM (BTW)
* 1.4.3 Toshiba Bluetooth Stack
* 1.4.4 CSR Harmony
* 1.4.5 IVT BlueSoleil (1000Moons)
* 1.4.6 AVM BlueFRITZ!
* 1.4.7 Digianswer BTSWS

I think at least one Bluetooth stack like that,
could be purchased as a separate item. Back when
the stacks weren't equal, and some had more
profiles than others.

Just about every stack has A2DP so you can use audio
headphones or earpieces.



So that's a few things to check.

Bluetooth is "the most rubbish you can get for $25",
and I expect 90% of purchased items are just thrown
in the trash in disgust. I wasn't too impressed with
what I got.

Bluetooth and Wifi operate at 2.5GHz or so. And
emissions from USB3 cables happen to have a broad
peak at 2.5GHz. While doing your first pairing
experiments, try not to be doing a backup on your
USB3 hard drive, at the same instant in time. Unplug
any unnecessary USB3 for a moment, until you've got it
all running. USB2 and USB1 don't have nearly the same
problems on emissions. My BT devices only work at a distance
of six feet (did I mention "rubbish"?).

Paul
Java Jive (07.03.2019, 23:12)
On 07/03/2019 19:57, Paul wrote:
> Java Jive wrote:
> I presume your Device Manager shows a Bluetooth entry,
> and there are no yellow marks?


No, as in my OP, Device Manager shows three devices with exclamation
marks labelled 'Bluetooth Peripheral Device'.

> On Win7,
> I would guess you need the stack that came on the CD
> with the Bluetooth device. If the Bluetooth is built
> into the machine, was there from the beginning, check
> the laptop website driver page, and see if there is a
> Bluetooth stack to use for Win7.


I think I have the Bluetooth Stack. In the past I've successfully
paired with my (now dead) Samsung Galaxy S2 mobile phone, and just now
with another laptop as a test case. However the other PC with this same
build, but downgraded to Home Premium, can't install 'drivers' for that
same laptop.

>
> So that's a few things to check.
> Bluetooth is "the most rubbish you can get for $25",
> and I expect 90% of purchased items are just thrown
> in the trash in disgust. I wasn't too impressed with
> what I got.


I've definitely had it working in the past, my problem now is
rediscovering how!
David Higton (07.03.2019, 23:14)
In message <MPG.36eb49da2136388989b85>
pjp <pjpoirier_is_located> wrote:

>What little research I've done suggesst Bluetooth is not very good over
>any distance at all. Makes me wonder how good it'd work running these
>Bluetooth speakers etc. outside on the patio with pc upstairs on
>opposite side of house or in basement recroom etc.


Bluetooth was only ever conceived as a short distance system. The
standard recognises different classes, which represent different
transmit powers. Class 1 can give up to 100 metres range, but only
under good line-of-sight conditions, and aren't common. Wikipedia
suggests (and I believe it) that most devices are class 2, which
equates to a range of about 10 metres, again under good line-of-sight
conditions. Real life ranges will in most circumstances be less.

So you shouldn't expect Bluetooth to work in the circumstances you
describe above.

David
Roger Mills (07.03.2019, 23:52)
On 07/03/2019 18:07, Java Jive wrote:
[..]
> when pairing a W7 PC and a Samsung mobile, and can they suggest anything
> to help?
> TIA


Does it need to be bluetooth?

FTP over WiFi works quite well between W7 and Android devices.
Wolf K (08.03.2019, 02:13)
On 2019-03-07 14:32, pjp wrote:
> In article <q5rmlk$e9l>, java says...


Quite so, there's more than to it than having a Bluetooth receiver.
Bluetooth is just another wireless format. It's what's transmitted and
received that makes the Bluetooth device(s) work as expected.

Eg, I use a Bluetooth mouse with the Surface 2, but it doesn't work with
the W7 laptop.

The same is true of wi-fi. Just because you have a wi-fi on your device
doesn't mean you can use a wi-fi mouse with it, or stream content to
another wi-fi device, etc.

It's like two people speaking different languages. If neither
understands the other's language, they can't communicate, even though
their ears and brains and functioning normally.

[...]

I think you're SOL, unless someone has written an "unofficial" driver
and you are lucky enough enough to stumble across it. For that reason I
will wish you

Good Luck,
micky (08.03.2019, 02:53)
In alt.windows7.general, on Thu, 7 Mar 2019 18:07:41 +0000, Java Jive
<java> wrote:

>Has anyone else tried to pair via Bluetooth a Win 7 PC, Ultimate Edition
>if it matters, and a Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 SM-T719, LTE edition? I can
>link the two by USB cable, and copy data between the two, but now I have
>a potential need to link the two by Bluetooth.


As luck would have it, just today I started trying to connect my phone
to my win7 laptop with Bluetooth.

I'm about 80% of the way there but I have to sleep now. I'll tell you
more details in the morning.
[..]
nospam (08.03.2019, 04:56)
In article <PsigE.13656$bK.2492>, Wolf K
<wolfmac> wrote:

> Quite so, there's more than to it than having a Bluetooth receiver.
> Bluetooth is just another wireless format. It's what's transmitted and
> received that makes the Bluetooth device(s) work as expected.
> Eg, I use a Bluetooth mouse with the Surface 2, but it doesn't work with
> the W7 laptop.


why not?

if for some reason, the laptop doesn't have bluetooth, get a bluetooth
adapter.

> The same is true of wi-fi. Just because you have a wi-fi on your device
> doesn't mean you can use a wi-fi mouse with it, or stream content to
> another wi-fi device, etc.


a wifi mouse is extremely unusual, however, streaming is not. if both
devices have wifi, then streaming will work the same as with anything
else.

> It's like two people speaking different languages. If neither
> understands the other's language, they can't communicate, even though
> their ears and brains and functioning normally.


he said both devices have bluetooth, and was able to pair them.

> [...]
> I think you're SOL, unless someone has written an "unofficial" driver
> and you are lucky enough enough to stumble across it. For that reason I
> will wish you
> Good Luck,


from his description, he wants to copy files over bluetooth, which is
slow and not a good idea. wifi is a *much* better choice for copying
files, ideally p2p wifi if it's supported.

however, it can still be done via bluetooth:
<
over-bluetooth>
Andy Burns (08.03.2019, 10:06)
Java Jive wrote:

> Has anyone else tried to pair via Bluetooth a Win 7 PC, Ultimate Edition
> if it matters, and a Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 SM-T719, LTE edition?  I can
> link the two by USB cable, and copy data between the two, but now I have
> a potential need to link the two by Bluetooth.


Not exactly the same, but with Win10 (using the microsoft bluetooth
stack) paired to a google pixel phone, I can send or receive a file in
either direction using fsquirt.exe
micky (08.03.2019, 12:50)
In alt.windows7.general, on Thu, 7 Mar 2019 21:12:55 +0000, Java Jive
<java> wrote:

>On 07/03/2019 19:57, Paul wrote:
>No, as in my OP, Device Manager shows three devices with exclamation
>marks labelled 'Bluetooth Peripheral Device'.


First, Could it be a problem that my little Bluetooth receiver (half the
size of a penny) is plugged into a USB hub, and not the laptop
directly?? I don't think the Dell Latitude E4300 came with bluetooth.

In my situation, win7 on a Dell laptop, it came on with a little box
that meant it was looking for drivers. I disconnected the bluetooth
gizmo last night but didn't get that same box again today.

It had 4 lines and it found all 4 things and in the Device Manager, it
has a section near the top (since it's in alphabetical order) Bluetooth
Radios, with two entries, Generic Bluetooth Radio and Microsoft
Bluetooth Enumerator.

Neither have yellow marks, and both say they are working properly.

Also a bluetooh icon appeared in the systray and right clicking that
gave 3 interesting choices.
Open Settings -- "Allow Bluetooth devices to find this computer" was
unchecked. I checked it and applied it. The other 3 were already
checked.

Show Bluetooth Devices -- none found. It shows All Control Panel
Items / Devices and Printers / Bluetooth Devices, none found. But when
I click on Devices and Printers, it shows 2 (built-in) printers and
faxes, 1unspecified (the usb spearkers), and 6 devices, the keyboard,
the webcam, the mouse, the computer itself, Generic Bluetooth Radio and
I missed this one at first, Android.
Clicking on the Generic Bluetooth Radio didn't work last night (It
showed Generic Bluetooth Radio Properties) so I'll try the Android
phone. (It just shows Android Properties)

Join a Personal Area Network E4300-PC-51560

Add a Device -- shows an image of a phone marked Redmi Bluetooth
phone

After several t ries finally got a new entry on my phone.
The category is Rarely Used Other Devices
The name is 00:11:22:98;76:54

Tapping it, it said Pairing, and then "Couldn't pair with [number above]
because of an incorrect PIN or passkey." but no request was given for
PIN.
Even though I've never sucessfully put a code number from one end into
the other end, Control Panel / Networks and Sharing Center seem to say
that the network is complete. Network Map would give the Wireless
Network of Redmi (my phone is Redmi) but it can't discover any computer
or device.

Tried the Trouble Shooter for both the Bluetooth Radio and the
Cellphone. No help

Somewhere along the line there was a Help button, which brought up "Add
a wireless or network device: frequently asked questions". Maybe it's
time I read that.

Well, so far, no luck. It actually asked my phone for the code,
suggesting 0000 and 1234, but neither worked.
[..]
micky (08.03.2019, 13:48)
In alt.windows7.general, on Fri, 8 Mar 2019 08:06:46 +0000, Andy Burns
<usenet> wrote:

>Java Jive wrote:
>Not exactly the same, but with Win10 (using the microsoft bluetooth
>stack) paired to a google pixel phone, I can send or receive a file in
>either direction using fsquirt.exe


I may be barking up the whole wrong tree.

I get that if Bluetooth works, I can send a file back or forth, but what
I wanted was to play the cellphone app radio through the better, louder
speakers of the laptop. Like I can with the cellphone and the car
radio.

Does anyone do this? Is there a way to do this?

I only paid, 5 years ago or so, a dollar and a dollar and a half for two
bluetooth receivers, one of which worked with the desktop, But they
came with no instructions** and since I can't manage to make it work
with the laptop, I'm ready to buy a more expensive one. But if I wont'
be able to play the phone radio through the laptop, there is no point.

**And half of the plastic case has fallen off the one I have with me.
Andy Burns (08.03.2019, 15:19)
micky wrote:

> what
> I wanted was to play the cellphone app radio through the better, louder
> speakers of the laptop


I doubt it's set-up to work that way, far more likely to play audio from
the laptop to a higher quality speaker ... probably nothing in the spec
preventing it, but nobody would expect you to want to do it.
Andy Burns (08.03.2019, 15:27)
Andy Burns wrote:

> nobody would expect you to want to do it.


Seems the MS bluetooth audio profile can only act as a "source", not as
a "sink" ...
Andy Burns (08.03.2019, 15:34)
Andy Burns wrote:

> Seems the MS bluetooth audio profile can only act as a "source", not as
> a "sink" ...


Forgot the link

<https://superuser.com/questions/1331686>

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