ukclique > food+drink.* > food+drink.misc

Brian Reay (30.12.2018, 22:48)
I enjoyed pears poached in red wine recently and decided to serve them as
part of Xmas lunch - today due to one of our daughters being a Dr and
working on Xmas Day.

However, faced with the problem of limited ‘rings’ on the hob etc, I
decided to look for a slow cooker approach. A bootle of Mulled Wine, I
suspect a raffle price, some caster sugar, extra nutmeg (I like the smell),
and some vanilla essence, 8 pears, peeled, halved, and pip cases removed. 4
hours on low, or until the pears are soft.

You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.
spuorgelgoog (01.01.2019, 23:11)
On Sunday, 30 December 2018 20:48:24 UTC, Brian Reay wrote:
> You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
> serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.


Sounds lovely, but I still think a jumbo bar of Dairy Milk is even easier ...

Owain
Kev (03.01.2019, 00:21)
On 30/12/2018 20:48, Brian Reay wrote:
> I enjoyed pears poached in red wine recently and decided to serve them as
> part of Xmas lunch - today due to one of our daughters being a Dr and
> working on Xmas Day.
> However, faced with the problem of limited ‘rings’ on the hob etc, I
> decided to look for a slow cooker approach. A bootle of Mulled Wine, I
> suspect a raffle price, some caster sugar, extra nutmeg (I like the smell),
> and some vanilla essence, 8 pears, peeled, halved, and pip cases removed. 4
> hours on low, or until the pears are soft.
> You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
> serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.


Very nice - I was cooking up quinces in a similar way recently - delicious!
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes (23.01.2019, 20:31)
On 30 Dec 2018, Brian Reay wrote
(in article <q0baun$ilo$1>):

> I enjoyed pears poached in red wine recently and decided to serve them as
> part of Xmas lunch - today due to one of our daughters being a Dr and
> working on Xmas Day.
> However, faced with the problem of limited ‘rings’ on the hob etc, I
> decided to look for a slow cooker approach. A bootle of Mulled Wine, I
> suspect a raffle price, some caster sugar, extra nutmeg (I like the smell),
> and some vanilla essence, 8 pears, peeled, halved, and pip cases removed. 4
> hours on low, or until the pears are soft.
> You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
> serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.


Sounds lovely.

I’ve never thought of a slow cooker as a dessert producer - thanks.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes (23.01.2019, 20:32)
On 1 Jan 2019, spuorgelgoog wrote
(in article<23b194cd-1a8b-4b3f-a590-5495674def8f>):

> On Sunday, 30 December 2018 20:48:24 UTC, Brian Reay wrote:
> > You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
> > serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.

> Sounds lovely, but I still think a jumbo bar of Dairy Milk is even easier ...
> Owain


Galaxy for me.
Ophelia (23.01.2019, 20:44)
"Fruitiest of Fruitcakes" wrote in message
news:02ef

On 30 Dec 2018, Brian Reay wrote
(in article <q0baun$ilo$1>):

[..]
> hours on low, or until the pears are soft.
> You can serve hot, warm, or cool. You can thicken the syrup by reducing or
> serve as a drink. Serve the pears with cream or ice cream.


Sounds lovely.

I’ve never thought of a slow cooker as a dessert producer - thanks.

==

Same here! I have never had a lot of success, which is what I know now, is
using too much liquid!

I am just beginning to realise you don't even 'need' liquid:))

The last thing I cooked in there was chicken which turned out so badly
overdone ... :(
Brian Reay (23.01.2019, 21:08)
On 23/01/2019 18:44, Ophelia wrote:
> "Fruitiest of Fruitcakes"  wrote in message
> news:02ef


> Sounds lovely.
> I’ve never thought of a slow cooker as a dessert producer - thanks.
> ==
> Same here!  I have never had a lot of success, which is what I know now,
> is using too much liquid!
> I am just beginning to realise you don't even 'need' liquid:))
> The last thing I cooked in there was chicken which turned out so badly
> overdone ... :(


I find the slow cooker good for stew type dishes where it is (almost)
impossible to overcook things. Also soups, although I tend to make those
in larger quantities than ours will hold so it has only been used a few
times.

I saw a video on Youtube showing how to do mashed potato in one.
Obviously not a complicated dish but if you are short of hob space, it
may be useful. Other videos show how to cook rice but they seem a bit
imprecise in terms of cooking time. To me, having a window of 30 mins in
which the rice may be finished really isn't acceptable.

A couple of American friends I chat to regularly were singing the
praises of Instant Pots- essentially electric pressure cookers, although
they can do other things. I'm not a huge fan of cooking gadgets- at
least not this kind of gadget, so I've not rushed to buy one.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes (23.01.2019, 21:32)
On 23 Jan 2019, Brian Reay wrote
(in article <q2ae35$dip$1>):

[..]
> praises of Instant Pots- essentially electric pressure cookers, although
> they can do other things. I'm not a huge fan of cooking gadgets- at
> least not this kind of gadget, so I've not rushed to buy one.


We steam most (not quite all) of our veg, which I find reduces the hob
occupation somewhat. I just pile two or three containers of veg on the
saucepan of water and leave them for 30-40 minutes.

If I am really pushed, I can also add potatoes to the boiling water on the
saucepan at the bottom.

I love beef done in a slow cooker, but have to admit that I can’t
remember doing anything else.
graham (23.01.2019, 21:36)
On 2019-01-23 12:32 p.m., Fruitiest of Fruitcakes wrote:
> On 23 Jan 2019, Brian Reay wrote
> (in article <q2ae35$dip>):
> We steam most (not quite all) of our veg, which I find reduces the hob
> occupation somewhat. I just pile two or three containers of veg on the
> saucepan of water and leave them for 30-40 minutes.
> If I am really pushed, I can also add potatoes to the boiling water on the
> saucepan at the bottom.
> I love beef done in a slow cooker, but have to admit that I can’t
> remember doing anything else.

Ideal for cooking xmas puddings. You can leave them simmering all night
without fear of running dry and on the day, they will keep the pudding
hot until needed.
Brian Reay (23.01.2019, 22:14)
On 23/01/2019 19:32, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes wrote:
> We steam most (not quite all) of our veg, which I find reduces the hob
> occupation somewhat. I just pile two or three containers of veg on the
> saucepan of water and leave them for 30-40 minutes.


We steam a few things- asparagus, mange tous, sugar snap peas spring to
mind.

> If I am really pushed, I can also add potatoes to the boiling water on the
> saucepan at the bottom.
> I love beef done in a slow cooker, but have to admit that I can’t
> remember doing anything else.


I tend to cooker stew type things in bulk and then freeze them. I have a
big Le Creuset which must hold 12 servings at least. I bought it when
the children were still at home (we've 3 daughters) and it was ideal for
cooking forward as we both worked. Even though we are retired and the
girls have their own places, we still cook forward. We like things
stews, coq au vin, etc. which are great for bulk cooking. Plus, of
course, thick, proper soups- being Northerners (even if we live in the
South), we like soup you can stand a spoon in ;-)
Ophelia (23.01.2019, 22:14)
"Brian Reay" wrote in message news:dip1

On 23/01/2019 18:44, Ophelia wrote:
> "Fruitiest of Fruitcakes" wrote in message
> news:02ef


> Sounds lovely.
> I’ve never thought of a slow cooker as a dessert producer - thanks.
> ==
> Same here! I have never had a lot of success, which is what I know now,
> is using too much liquid!
> I am just beginning to realise you don't even 'need' liquid:))
> The last thing I cooked in there was chicken which turned out so badly
> overdone ... :(


I find the slow cooker good for stew type dishes where it is (almost)
impossible to overcook things. Also soups, although I tend to make those
in larger quantities than ours will hold so it has only been used a few
times.

I saw a video on Youtube showing how to do mashed potato in one.
Obviously not a complicated dish but if you are short of hob space, it
may be useful. Other videos show how to cook rice but they seem a bit
imprecise in terms of cooking time. To me, having a window of 30 mins in
which the rice may be finished really isn't acceptable.

A couple of American friends I chat to regularly were singing the
praises of Instant Pots- essentially electric pressure cookers, although
they can do other things. I'm not a huge fan of cooking gadgets- at
least not this kind of gadget, so I've not rushed to buy one.

===

Ohh don't get me started on something else :(( I just got Air Fryers ... !!

Anyway, I have a pressure cooker:)
Ophelia (23.01.2019, 22:17)
"Brian Reay" wrote in message news:7he1

On 23/01/2019 19:32, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes wrote:
> We steam most (not quite all) of our veg, which I find reduces the hob
> occupation somewhat. I just pile two or three containers of veg on the
> saucepan of water and leave them for 30-40 minutes.


We steam a few things- asparagus, mange tous, sugar snap peas spring to
mind.

> If I am really pushed, I can also add potatoes to the boiling water on the
> saucepan at the bottom.
> I love beef done in a slow cooker, but have to admit that I can’t
> remember doing anything else.


I tend to cooker stew type things in bulk and then freeze them. I have a
big Le Creuset which must hold 12 servings at least. I bought it when
the children were still at home (we've 3 daughters) and it was ideal for
cooking forward as we both worked. Even though we are retired and the
girls have their own places, we still cook forward. We like things
stews, coq au vin, etc. which are great for bulk cooking. Plus, of
course, thick, proper soups- being Northerners (even if we live in the
South), we like soup you can stand a spoon in ;-)

==

Yers you are a Northerner!!!! And don't you forge it ;p

Please share your coq au vin recipe and particularly ... the volume of
liquid and especially timing .. please?
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes (23.01.2019, 22:23)
On 23 Jan 2019, graham wrote
(in article <q2afnk$ngl$1>):

> On 2019-01-23 12:32 p.m., Fruitiest of Fruitcakes wrote:
> Ideal for cooking xmas puddings. You can leave them simmering all night
> without fear of running dry and on the day, they will keep the pudding
> hot until needed.


Christmas puddings are my wife’s domain, so I keep well away.

She steams hers well before the big day, and then microwaves it on the
25th.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes (23.01.2019, 22:35)
On 23 Jan 2019, Brian Reay wrote
(in article <q2ahva$7he$1>):

[..]
> stews, coq au vin, etc. which are great for bulk cooking. Plus, of
> course, thick, proper soups- being Northerners (even if we live in the
> South), we like soup you can stand a spoon in ;-)


Nice.

And thick gravy, I hope.
Brian Reay (23.01.2019, 22:49)
On 23/01/2019 20:14, Ophelia wrote:
> "Brian Reay"  wrote in message news:q2ae35$dip.
> A couple of American friends I chat to regularly were singing the
> praises of Instant Pots- essentially electric pressure cookers, although
> they can do other things. I'm not a huge fan of cooking gadgets- at
> least not this kind of gadget, so I've not rushed to buy one.
> ===
> Ohh don't get me started on something else :((  I just got Air Fryers
> ... !!


Now that is something I would like!

> Anyway, I have a pressure cooker:)


We used one for years but it wasn't compatible with our induction hob-
there are two types of stainless stainless steel and ours was the wrong
one. We first got one when we were students and it really earned its
keep. We changed to a stainless one as we were worried about the Aluminium.

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